Social Studies

Question Answer
Persian War The Greece-Persian Wars were a series of conflicts between the Achievement Empire of Persia and Greek city-states
Battle Of Marathon The Battle of Marathon took place in 490 BC, during the first Persian invasion of Greece. It was fought between the citizens of Athens, aided by Plataea, and a Persian force commanded by Datis and Cartographers
Battle Of Thermopylae Famous battle in 480 BC; a Greek army under Leonidas was annihilated by the Persians who were trying to conquer Greece. A fierce battle fought in close combat between troops in predetermined positions at a chosen time and place.
Delian league The Delian League (or Athenian League) was an alliance of Greek city-states led by Athens and formed in 478 BCE to liberate eastern Greek cities from Persian rule and as a defence to possible revenge attacks from Persia.
Acropolis the ancient citadel at Athens, containing the Parthenon and other notable buildings, mostly dating from the 5th century BC
Peloponnesian war The Peloponnesian War was an ancient Greek war fought by the Delian League led by Athens against the Peloponnesian League led by Sparta. Historians have traditionally divided the war into three phases.
Hellenistic culture Hellenization, or Hellenism, refers to the spread of Greek culture that had begun after the conquest of Alexander the Great in the fourth century, B.C.E. One must think of the development of the eastern Mediterranean, really, in two major phases
Phillip 2nd of Macedonia Philip II of Macedon was the king of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon from 359 BC until his assassination in 336 BC.
Alexander the great Alexander III of Macedon, commonly known as Alexander the Great, was a king of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty
Pericles Pericles was a prominent and influential Greek statesman, orator and general of Athens during the Golden Age—specifically the time between the Persian and Peloponnesian wars.

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