Organizational Process Assets and Enterprise Environmental Factors

OPA
Organizational process assets are the plans, processes, policies, procedures, and knowledge bases specific to and used by the performing organization. They include any artifact, practice, or knowledge from any or all of the organizations involved in the project that can be used to perform or govern the project. The process assets also include the organization’s knowledge bases such as lessons learned and historical information. Organizational process assets may include completed schedules, risk data, and earned value data. Organizational process assets are inputs to most planning processes. Throughout the project, the project team members may update and add to the organizational process assets as necessary. Organizational process assets may be grouped into two categories: (1) processes and procedures, and (2) corporate knowledge base.

Project Management Institute (2012-09-01). A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge ( PMBOK® Guide )—Fifth Edition (ENGLISH) (Kindle Locations 955-960). Project Management Institute. Kindle Edition.

OPA – Processes and Procedures
The organization’s processes and procedures for conducting project work include, but are not limited to:
Initiating and Planning:
Guidelines and criteria for tailoring the organization’s set of standard processes and procedures to satisfy the specific needs of the project;
Specific organizational standards such as policies (e.g., human resources policies, health and safety policies, ethics policies, and project management policies), product and project life cycles, and quality policies and procedures (e.g., process audits, improvement targets, checklists, and standardized process definitions for use in the organization); and
Templates (e.g., risk register, work breakdown structure, project schedule network diagram, and contract templates).

Executing, Monitoring and Controlling:
Change control procedures, including the steps by which performing organization standards, policies, plans, and procedures or any project documents will be modified, and how any changes will be approved and validated;
Financial controls procedures (e.g., time reporting, required expenditure and disbursement reviews, accounting codes, and standard contract provisions); Issue and defect management procedures defining issue and defect controls, issue and defect identification and resolution, and action item tracking; Organizational communication requirements (e.g., specific communication technology available, authorized communication media, record retention policies, and security requirements);
Procedures for prioritizing, approving, and issuing work authorizations; Risk control procedures, including risk categories, risk statement templates, probability and impact definitions, and probability and impact matrix; and Standardized guidelines, work instructions, proposal evaluation criteria, and performance measurement criteria. Closing: Project closure guidelines or requirements (e.g., lessons learned, final project audits, project evaluations, product validations, and acceptance criteria).

OPA Corporate Knowledge Base
The organizational knowledge base for storing and retrieving information includes, but is not limited to: Configuration management knowledge bases containing the versions and baselines of all performing organization standards, policies, procedures, and any project documents;

– Financial databases containing information such as labor hours, incurred costs, budgets, and any project cost overruns;
– Historical information and lessons learned knowledge bases (e.g., project records and documents, all project closure information and documentation, information regarding both the results of previous project selection decisions and previous project performance information, and information from risk management activities);
– Issue and defect management databases containing issue and defect status, control information, issue and defect resolution, and action item results;
– Process measurement databases used to collect and make available measurement data on processes and products; and
– Project files from previous projects (e.g., scope, cost, schedule, and performance measurement baselines, project calendars, project schedule network diagrams, risk registers, planned response actions, and defined risk impact).

EEV
Enterprise environmental factors refer to conditions, not under the control of the project team, that influence, constrain, or direct the project. Enterprise environmental factors are considered inputs to most planning processes, may enhance or constrain project management options, and may have a positive or negative influence on the outcome.

Enterprise environmental factors vary widely in type or nature. Enterprise environmental factors include, but are not limited to:
– Organizational culture, structure, and governance;
– Geographic distribution of facilities and resources; – Government or industry standards (e.g., regulatory agency regulations, codes of conduct, product standards, quality standards, and workmanship standards);
– Infrastructure (e.g., existing facilities and capital equipment);
– Existing human resources (e.g., skills, disciplines, and knowledge, such as design, development, legal, contracting, and purchasing);
– Personnel administration (e.g., staffing and retention guidelines, employee performance reviews and training records, reward and overtime policy, and time tracking); – Company work authorization systems;
– Marketplace conditions;
– Stakeholder risk tolerances;
– Political climate;
– Organization’s established communications channels; Commercial databases (e.g., standardized cost estimating data, industry risk study information, and risk databases); and
– Project management information system (e.g., an automated tool, such as a scheduling software tool, a configuration management system, an information collection and distribution system, or web interfaces to other online automated systems).

Project Integration Management – Project Charter: EEV
– Governmental standards,
– industry standards, or regulations (e.g. codes of conduct, quality standards, or worker protection standards),
– Organizational culture and structure, and Marketplace conditions.
Project Integration Management – Project Charter: OPA
Develop Project Charter process include, but are not limited to:
– Organizational standard processes, policies, and process definitions,
– Templates (e.g., project charter template), and
– Historical information and lessons learned knowledge base (e.g., projects, records, and documents; all project closure information and documentation; information about both the results of previous project selection decisions and previous project performance information; and information from the risk management activity).
Project Integration Management – Project Plan: EVA
– Governmental or industry standards;
– Project management body of knowledge for vertical market (e.g., construction) and/ or focus area (e.g. environmental, safety, risk, or agile software development);
– Project management information system (e.g., an automated tool, such as a scheduling software tool, a configuration management system, an information collection and distribution system, or web interfaces to other online automated systems);
– Organizational structure, culture, management practices, and sustainability;
– Infrastructure (e.g., existing facilities and capital equipment); and
– Personnel administration (e.g., hiring and termination guidelines, employee performance reviews, and employee development and training records).
Project Integration Management – Project Plan: OPA
– Standardized guidelines, work instructions, proposal evaluation criteria, and performance measurement criteria;
– Project management plan template, including:
Guidelines and criteria for tailoring the organization’s set of standard processes to satisfy the specific needs of the project, and
Project closure guidelines or requirements such as the product validation and acceptance criteria;
– Change control procedures, including the steps by which official organization standards, policies, plans, and procedures, or any project documents will be modified and how any changes will be approved and validated;
– Project files from previous projects (e.g., scope, cost, schedule and performance measurement baselines, project calendars, project schedule network diagrams, and risk registers);
– Historical information and lessons learned knowledge base; and
– Configuration management knowledge base containing the versions and baselines of all official organization standards, policies, procedures, and any project
Direct and Manage Project Work: EVA
– Organizational, company, or customer culture and structure of the performing or sponsor organizations;
– Infrastructure (e.g., existing facilities and capital equipment);
– Personnel administration (e.g., hiring and firing guidelines, employee performance reviews, and training records);
– Stakeholder risk tolerances, for example allowable cost overrun percentage; and
– Project management information system (e.g., an automated tool suite, such as a scheduling software tool, a configuration management system, an information collection and distribution system, or web interfaces to other online automated systems).
Direct and Manage Project Work: OPA
– Standardized guidelines and work instructions;
– Communication requirements defining allowed communication media, record retention, and security requirements;
– Issue and defect management procedures defining issue and defect controls, issue and defect identification and resolution, and action item tracking;
– Process measurement database used to collect and make available measurement data on processes and products;
– Project files from previous projects (e.g., scope, cost, schedule, performance measurement baselines, project calendars, project schedule network diagrams, risk registers, planned response actions, defined risk impact, and documented lessons learned); and
– Issue and defect management database( s) containing historical issue and defect
Monitor and Control Project