MGMT425 9

D) moral managers, amoral managers, and immoral managers.
The three categories of managers that stand out with regard to the beliefs and commitments they have to ethical and moral principles in business affairs are:
A) ethical managers, socially responsible managers, and crooked managers.
B) mostly ethical managers, somewhat unethical managers, and ethically corrupt managers.
C) ethically-principled managers, ethically-unprincipled managers, and ethically-neutral managers.
D) moral managers, amoral managers, and immoral managers.
E) ethically responsible managers, ethically irresponsible managers, and ethically unconcerned
managers.
E) moral managers, immoral managers, and amoral managers.
The categories of managerial morality include:
A) honorable managers, dishonorable managers, and totally corrupt managers.
B) mostly ethical managers, somewhat ethical managers, and totally unethical managers.
C) ethically-principled managers, ethically-unprincipled managers, and if-it-is-legal-then-it-is-ethical
managers ( the latter type of manager believes that ethics don’t really apply to business—their view is
that anything that is legal is also ethical).
D) managers with lots of integrity, managers with some integrity, and managers with no integrity.
E) moral managers, immoral managers, and amoral managers.
E) All of the above.
Moralmanagers
A) are ethically principled.
B) see themselves as stewards of ethical behavior and believe it is important to exercise ethical
leadership.
C) pursue success within the letter and spirit of what is considered ethical and legal.
D) view what is legal as the ethical minimum and have a habit of operating at well above what the law
requires.
E) All of the above.
B) see themselves as stewards of ethical behavior and believe it is important to exercise ethical leadership;
Moral managers
A) are skeptical about ethics and ethical standards but feel obligated to observe the company code of
ethics.
B) see themselves as stewards of ethical behavior and believe it is important to exercise ethical leadership;
they are ethically principled and pursue success within the letter and spirit of what is considered ethical
and legal.
C) try to stay within ethical bounds for fear of being caught doing something unethical and having their
careers ruined.
D) view what is legal as also ethical.
E) are ethically-principled as long as they see such behavior being in their own self-interest.
B) has no regard for so-called ethical standards in business and pays no attention to ethical principles in making business decisions—an immoral manager is driven by greed and self-gain and won’t hesitate
An immoral manager is one who
A) is ethically-principled most of the time but who might stoop to unethical behavior if there’s low risk of
discovery and the action or decision has a sizable positive effect on company profitability.
B) has no regard for so-called ethical standards in business and pays no attention to ethical principles in making business decisions—an immoral manager is driven by greed and self-gain and won’t hesitate
to violate ethical principles if it is in his/her best interest to do so.
C) is ethically unprincipled but nonetheless usually observes ethical standards for fear of getting caught
and fired.
D) believes that ethical standards violate the principle of moral free space and therefore are illegitimate.
E) strongly believes that it is ethical to do whatever is legal.
D) views the observance of high ethical standards (doing more than what is required by law) as too
An intentionally amoral manager is one who
A) is ethically-principled most of the time but who knowingly and willingly stoops to unethical behavior
if there’s low risk of discovery and the action or decision has a sizable positive effect on company
profitability.
B) deliberately and maliciously violates ethical principles on a regular basis.
C) believes business and ethics are not to be mixed because different rules apply in business as compared
to other realms of life.
D) views the observance of high ethical standards (doing more than what is required by law) as too
Sunday-schoolish for the tough competitive world of business, even though observing some higher
ethical considerations may be appropriate in life outside of business.
E) strongly believes that whatever is legal is also ethical.
B) is casual about, careless about, or inattentive to the fact that certain types of business decisions or
An unintentionally amoral manager is one who
A) is ethically-principled most of the time but who is also prone to being unethical when there’s low risk
of being discovered and/or it is in his/her best interests.
B) is casual about, careless about, or inattentive to the fact that certain types of business decisions or
company activities may have adverse impacts on others.
C) strongly believes in the integrated social contract theory approach to ethics in business.
D) strongly believes in ethical relativism.
E) strongly believes in ethical universalism.
B) ethically amoral most of the time but may slip into a moral or immoral mode based on a variety of
The best available evidence indicates that the average manager in the whole population of managers is
A) ethically corrupt.
B) ethically amoral most of the time but may slip into a moral or immoral mode based on a variety of
impinging factors and circumstances.
C) mostly ethical.
D) ethically moral and is fairly steadfast in taking ethically correct positions.
E) ethically immoral and unprincipled, especially when the chances of being discovered are slim; however,
in public, the average manager is prone to give every appearance of being ethically principled and to profess support for ethically correct behavior.
A) distributed among moral, immoral, and amoral managers in a bell-shaped curve, with immoral
By some accounts, the population of managers is said to be
A) distributed among moral, immoral, and amoral managers in a bell-shaped curve, with immoral
managers and moral managers occupying the two tails of the curve, and amoral managers, especially
the intentionally amoral managers, occupying the broad middle ground.
B) composed of mostly ethically moral managers but perhaps a third of all managers slip into an immoral
or unethical mode in certain circumstances.
C) about 15% highly ethical, 50% mostly ethical, and 35% ethically corrupt.
D) about 20% highly ethical, 60% mostly ethical, and 20% mostly unethical.
E) about one-third highly ethical, one-third mostly ethical, and one-third mostly unethical.
A) the unconcerned or non-issue approach, the damage control approach, the compliance approach, and
The stance a company takes in dealing with or managing ethical conduct at any given point in time can take such basic forms as
A) the unconcerned or non-issue approach, the damage control approach, the compliance approach, and
the ethical culture approach.
B) the amoral approach, the immoral approach, and the ethically-principled approach.
C) the ethically incorrect approach, the ethically correct approach, and the socially responsible
approach.
D) the noncompliance approach, the compliance approach, the public interest approach, and the cultural
norm approach.
E) the empowered employee approach, the cultural values approach, and the authoritarian approach.
C) The socially responsible approach
Which of the following is not a stance a company can take in dealing with or managing ethical conduct at any given point in time?
A) The unconcerned or non-issue approach
B) The damage control approach
C) The socially responsible approach
D) The ethical culture approach
E) The compliance approach