MGMT (Principles of Management) Chapter 1

MGMT
Principles of Management
Chuck Williams
Management
Is getting work done through others
Efficiency
Getting work done with a minimum of effort, expense, or waste
Effectiveness
Accomplishing tasks that help fulfill organizational objectives
Ceo, Fayol argued that
“The success of an enterprise generally depends much more on the administrative ability of its leaders than on their technical ability
What are the five managerial functions in order to be successful, according to Fayol
Planning, organizing, coordinating, commanding, and controlling.
The four functions of management
Planning, Organizing, Leading, Controlling
Planning
Determining organizational goals and a means for achieving them
Organizing
Deciding where decisions will be made, who will do what jobs and track, and who will work for whom
Leading
inspiring and motivating workers to work hard to achieve organizational goals
Controlling
monitoring progress toward goal achievement and taking corrective action when needed
Top Managers Cheif executive officer (CEO), chief information officer (CIO)
Responsibilities is Change, Commitment, Culture, Environment
Top Managers chief operating officer (COO), Vice president
Responsibilities is Change,Commitment, Culture, Environment
Top Managers chief financial officer (CFO), Corporate heads
Responsibilities is Change, Commitment, Culture, Environment
Middle Managers General Manager
Responsibilities is Resources, Objectives, Coordination, Subunit performance, Strategy implementation
Middle Managers Plant Manager
Responsibilities is Resources, Objectives, Coordination, Subunit performance, Strategy implementation
Middle Managers Regional Manager
Responsibilities is Resources, Objectives, Coordination, Subunit performance, Strategy implementation
Middle Managers Divisional Manager
Responsibilities is Resources, Objectives, Coordination, Subunit performance, Strategy implementation
First-Line Managers Office manager
Responsibilities is Nonmanagerial worker supervision, Teaching and training, Scheduling, Facilitation
First-Line Managers Shift supervisor
Responsibilities is Nonmanagerial worker supervision, Teaching and training, Scheduling, Facilitation
First-Line Managers Department manager
Responsibilities is Nonmanagerial worker supervision, Teaching and training, Scheduling, Facilitation
Team Leader Team Leader
Responsibilities is Facilitation, External relationships, Internal relationships
Team Leader Team contact
Responsibilities is Facilitation, External relationships, Internal relationships
Team Leader Group facilitator
Responsibilities is Facilitation, External relationships, Internal relationships
Top managers
executives responsible for the overall direction of the organization
Middle managers
responsible for setting objectives consistent with top management’s goals and for planning and implementing subunit strategies for achieving these objectives
CEO has a very specific job that only he or she can do
Link the external world with the internal organization
Link the external world with the internal organization
This means that top managers must closely monitor customer needs, competitors’ moves, and long-term business, economic, social trends
Middle management responsibility
is to plan and allocate resources to meet objectives
Middle management second responsibility
is to coordinate and link groups, departments, and divisions within a company
Middle management third responsibility
is to monitor and manage the performance of the subunits and individual managers who report to them
First-line managers
hold positions like office manager, shift supervisor, or department manager.
First-line managers primary responsibility
is to manage the performance of entry-level employees who are directly responsible for producing a company’s goods and services
First-line managers
are the only managers who don’t supervise other managers
First-line managers
are also responsible for teaching entry-level employees how to do their jobs
Top managers
Plans last for Three to Five years
Middle managers
Plans last for Six to Eighteen months out
First-line managers
Plans last for Two weeks
First-line managers
train and supervise the performance of non-managerial employees who are directly responsible for producing the company’s products or services
Team leaders
managers responsible for facilitating team activities toward goal accomplishment
First-line managers are responsible for
The performance of nonmanagerial eployess and have the authority to hire and fire workers, make job assignments, and control resources
Figurehead role
the interpersonal role managers play when they perform ceremonial duties
Managers Fulfill three major roles while performing their jobs
Interpersonal, informational, decisional
In fulfilling the interpersonal role of management, managers perform three subroles
figurehead, leader, and liaison
Figurehead role
managers perform ceremonial duties like greeting company visitors, speaking at the opening of a new facility, or representing the company at a community luncheon to support local charities
Mintzberg’s Managerial roles for Interpersonal Roles
Figurehead, Leader, and Liaison
Mintzberg’s Managerial roles for Informational Roles
Monitor, Disseminator, Spokesperson
Mintzberg’s Managerial roles for Decisional Roles
Entrepreneur, Disturbance Handler, Resource Allocator, Negotiator
CEOs who sit on outside boards
earn an average return on assets 15 percent higher than companies with CEOs who don’t sit on outside boards
Leader role
the interpersonal role managers play when they motivate and encourage workers to accomplish organizational objectives
Liason role
the interpersonal role mangers play when they deal with people outside their units
Monitor role
the informational role managers play when they scan their environment for information
Things that managers often do that create an uncomfortable unproductive work atmosphere
Pressuring employees to attend social events. When your employees are with people from work, even at some party, it might just end up feeling like “work”
Things that managers often do that create an uncomfortable unproductive work atmosphere
Asking an employee to do something that you’ve already asked someone else to do
Things that managers often do that create an uncomfortable unproductive work atmosphere
Pressuring employees to give to charity
Things that managers often do that create an uncomfortable unproductive work atmosphere
Not giving employees time to eat during mealtime hours
Things that managers often do that create an uncomfortable unproductive work atmosphere
Asking employees to evaluate their coworkers
Things that managers often do that create an uncomfortable unproductive work atmosphere
Asking employees to do self-evaluations
Things that managers often do that create an uncomfortable unproductive work atmosphere
Revealing too much information to employees
Things that managers often do that create an uncomfortable unproductive work atmosphere
Asking employees to make sure that you stay on course during meetings
Things that managers often do that create an uncomfortable unproductive work atmosphere
Asking employees to do something that you don’t want to do
According to Mintzberg, managers engage in four decisional subroles
entrepreneur, disturbance handler, resource allocator, and negotiator
Disseminator role
the informational role managers play when they share information with others in their departments or companies
Spokesperson role
the informational role managers play when they share information with people outside their departments or companies
Entrepreneur role
the decisional role managers play when they adapt themselves, their subordinates, and their subordinates, and their units to change
Disturbance handler
The decisional role managers play when they respond to severe pressures and problems that demand immediate action
Resource allocator role
the decisional role managers play when they decide who gets what resources and in what amounts
Negotiator role
the decisional role managers play when they negotiate schedules, projects, goals, outcomes, resources, and employee raises
Technical Skills
the specialized procedures, techniques, and knowledge required to get the job done
Human skills
the ability to work well with others
Conceptual skills
the ability to see the organization as whole, understand how the different parts affect each other, and recognize how the company fits into or is affected by its environment
When companies look for employees who would be good managers,
they look for individuals who have technical skills, human skills, conceptual skills, and the motivation to manage
Motivation to manage
is an assessment of how motivated employees are to interact with superiors, participate in competitive situations, behave assertively toward others, tell others what to do, reward good behavior and punish poor behavior, perform actions that are highly visible to others, and handle and organize administrative tasks
Top Ten Mistakes Managers Make
Insensitive to others: abrasive, intimidating, bullying style
Top Ten Mistakes Managers Make
cold, aloof, arrogant
Top Ten Mistakes Managers Make
Betray trust
Top Ten Mistakes Managers Make
overly ambitious: thinking of next job, playing politics
Top Ten Mistakes Managers Make
specific performance problems with the business
Top Ten Mistakes Managers Make
Overmanaging: unable to delegate or build a team
Top Ten Mistakes Managers Make
Unable to staff effectively
Top Ten Mistakes Managers Make
Unable to think strategically
Top Ten Mistakes Managers Make
Unable to adapt to boss with different style
Top Ten Mistakes Managers Make
Overdependent on advocate or mentor
Motivation to manage
an assessment of how ethusiastic employees are about managing the work of others
The top mistake made by derailers
is that they were insensitive to others by virtue of their abrasive, intimidating, and bullying manager style
The second mistake was that derailers
were often cold, aloof, or arrogant
Derailed managers
being so smart, so expert in their areas of knowledge, that they treated others with contempt because they weren’t experts, too.
Betraying a trust doesn’t mean being dishonest. Instead, it means
making others look bad by not doing what you said you would do when you said you would do it.
The fatal betrayal of trust is
failing to inform others when things will not be done on time
The distinguished behavior of derailers from arrivers
The failure to admit to mistakes, quickly inform others of mistakes, take responsibility for the mistakes, and then fix them without blaming others
The fatal mistakes of being unable to delegate, build a team, and staff effectively
indicate that many derailed managers were unable to make the most basic transition to managerial work: to quit being hands-on doers and get work done through others
The two things that go wrong when managers meddle in decisions that their subordinates should by making
(a)when they can’t stop being doers (b)they alienate the people who work for them
Managers’ initial expectations
Be the boss
Formal authority
Manage tasks
Job is not managing people
After six months as a manager
Initial expectations were wrong. Fast pace. Heavy workload
Job is to be problem solver and troubleshooter for subordinates
After a year as a manager
No longer a doer
Communication, listening, and positive, reinforcement
Learning to adapt to and control stress. Job is people development
Employment security
Is the ultimate form of commitment companies can make to their workers. Employees can innovate and increase company productivity without fearing the loss of their jobs
Selective Hiring
If employees are the basis for a company’s competitive advantage and those employees have employment security, then the company needs to aggressively recruit and selectively screen applicants in order to hire the most talented employees available
High Wages Contingent on organizational performance
High wages are needed to attract and retain talented workers and to indicate that the organization values its workers. Employees, like company founders, shareholders, and managers, need to share in the financial rewards when the company is successful. Why? Because employees who have a financial stake in their companies are more likely to take a long-run view of the business and think business owners
Self-Managed teams and decentralization
Are responsible for their own hiring, purchasing, job assignments, and production. Self-managed teams can often produce enormous increases in productivity through increased employee commitment and creativity. Decentralization allows employees who are closest to ( and most knowledgeable about) problems, production, and customers to make timely decisions. Decentralization increase employee satisfaction and commitment
Training and skill development
Like a high-tech company that spends millions of dollars to upgrade computers or research and development labs, a company whose competitive advantage is based on its people must invest in the training and skill development of its people
Reduction of status differences
A company should treat everyone, no matter what the job, as equal. There are no reserved parking spaces. Everyone eats in the same cafeteria and has similar benefits. the result: improved communication as employees focus on problems and solutions rather than on how they are less valued than managers
Sharing information
If employees are to make decisions that are good for the long-term health and success of the company, they need to be given information about costs, finances, productivity, development times, and strategies that was previously known only by company managers