MGMT 310 – Chapter 17

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Your team is most likely to succeed when team members:
Engage in constructive conflict with the team members
You can make an effective contribution to your team if you:
Reducing morale and teamwork
Which trait(s) do you tend to display by being a conservative, dominant, or stalling team member?
Complexity
Task ________ refers to the amount of information that must be processed to understand the task, the degree of uncertainty about possible outcomes, the presence of many subtasks that require a range of skills and knowledge, or the absence of standardized procedures to conduct the task
Task objectives
What orients team members toward their priorities and help them understand how their work fits in the bigger picture?
Determined by the task
The optimal size of a team should be:
Vertical
Jim is a marketing manager in an organization. Nick and Alex are the executives from the marketing department who report to Jim on the progress of an ongoing project. This scenario is best exemplifies a ________ team.
Horizontal
________ teams are composed of employees from about the same hierarchical level but from several different departments in the organization
Self-directed
Teams that determine their own objectives and the methods by which to achieve them are known as ________ teams
Geographically distributed
Tim, George, and Mark are team members of the HR department working on the same project from three different locations. They rely only on telephone calls and e-mails to interact with each other and to report to James who is the project manager. This scenario best exemplifies a ________ team
Provide resources
What should a manager typically do during the forming stage of team development?
Blocking behaviors
— inhibit the team and its members from achieving their objectives
Boundary managers persuade top management to support the team’s work
What statement about boundary managers is true?
Adjourning stage
The stage that occurs when a team has completed its task and the team is disbanded
Boundary manager
A manager who determines how the team will work with clients, upper management, and others who have an interest in the team’s product. They buffer the team from organizational infighting, persuade top management to support the team’s work, and coordinate and negotiate with other groups on work deadlines
Collocated teams
Teams that use a significant amount of face-to-face communication to make operating decisions. They operate in close proximity to one another, engage in a lot of social interaction, and provide quick feedback on the team’s progress to one another
Conformity
The action of people behaving in line with a group’s expectations and beliefs
Forming stage
The stage that occurs when team members define the task that is to be done and how that task is to be accomplished, setting the ground rules for the team
Geographically distributed teams
Teams that are made up of geographically or organizationally dispersed members who rely heavily on electronic tools such as e-mail, fax, voice mail, telephone, and videoconferencing to interact with one another
Horizontal teams
Teams composed of employees from about the same hierarchical level but from several different departments in the organization
Manager-led teams
Teams in which the manager acts as the team leader
Norming stage
The stage that occurs when team members uncover ways to create new standards that encourage more collaborative behavior
Participation
The extent to which individuals engage in the process of generating solutions and articulating their opinions and perspectives
Performing stage
The stage that occurs when team members adopt and play roles that enhance the activities of the group
Self-directed teams
Teams that determine their own objectives and the methods by which to achieve them
Social loafing
Disengaging from the team process and failing to contribute to the team’s recommendations or other deliverables
Storming stage
The stage that occurs when team members experience conflicts about interpersonal issues and differences in perspectives
Task complexity
The amount of information that must be processed to understand the task, the degree of uncertainty about possible outcomes, the presence of many subtasks that require a range of skills and knowledge, or the absence of standardized procedures to conduct the task
Task interdependence
The extent to which group members need to work with and rely on each other to produce the collective work of the group
Task objectives
Issues that orient team members toward their goals and priorities and help them understand how their work fits in the bigger picture
Team
A group of two or more people with complementary skills who are committed to working together to achieve a specific objective
Team norms
Expected team behaviors
Vertical teams
Teams composed of a manager and his or her subordinates in the formal chain of command, usually in one functional department
Teams
Tasks which require the interdependent perspectives of many individuals are better suited for:
Teams
The most effective — develop a common purpose and have members who are aligned in their pursuit of that purpose
Complexity
As a task grows in —, one individual is not likely to possess the required knowledge and ability to complete the task or solve the problem
Interdependent
While individual team members may complete portions of the larger task independently, effective teams have tasks that are —
Task interdependence
— is sometimes inherent in the tasks themselves
Clear direction
In addition to having a complex and interdependent task, effective teams also have a — that motivates team members and a specific timeline for task completion, all of which are established through the development of task objectives
Interpersonal skills
The ability to work well with others, openness to new ideas, supportiveness, action orientation, and a positive style are all important — that should be considered as part of designing an effective team
Mutual accountability
effective teams include members who possess a shared sense of —: each one carries his or her weight and contributes to the team’s objectives
20 members
As the size of a team increases beyond —, the tendency to collaborate decreases as coordination activities increase
Team effectiveness
Team members’ roles should always be clearly specified to ensure:
Leaders
In manager-led teams, — have the greatest amount of control over team members and the work they perform
Cross-functional
When manager-led teams are —, a multiperspective approach to problem solving can be used
Self-directed teams
While many believe that manager-led teams are most efficient, organizations that use — empower their workers by giving every team member authority and responsibility for team building and team progress
Collocated teams
Teams at Whole Foods represent:
Face-to-face interaction
Research shows that — can facilitate collaboration and teamwork
Relationships
Establishing trust, making connections, and committing to a shared team experience are all important in developing — among team members
Diverse team members
Given the breadth and depth of their personal and professional experiences, — tend to produce more creative and innovative solutions over the long term than do teams with more homogenous members
Homogenous
— teams tend to possess a common language and approach that facilitate and accelerate the group process
Diverse teams
— tend to struggle with group identity and process in the short term as its members have a limited base of mutual knowledge and experiences
Consistent
it is critical that an individual’s view of himself or herself is — with the team’s view of him or her
1st stage of team development
Forming is the — stage of team development
2nd
Storming is the — stage of team development
3rd
Norming is the — stage of team development
4th
Performing is the — stage of team development
5th
Adjourning is the — stage of team development
Midpoint
At the — of the team’s life, team members begin to search for new ideas and adopt new perspectives on their work in a push to complete the task on time
Meeting norms
When, where, and how often to have meetings; includes expectations for attendance, timeliness, and preparation
Working norms
Standards, deadlines, distribution of work, work review process, and accountability (addressing those who do not follow through on their commitments)
Communication norms
When communication should take place, who is responsible, how it should be done, and how to discuss feelings about the team or members especially in regard to issues of conflict
Leadership norms
What leadership structure should be used and how leadership should be exercised
Consideration norms
Treating others with mutual respect and being considerate of members’ needs
Team process
The three main components of the — are: purposeful and rigorous decision making, effective participation and meaningful influence, and constructive conflict
Critical thinking, debate
A strong team process should encourage — and — among members
Blocking behaviors
An imbalance of influence or participation can lead to:
Conformity
Although — may speed up the decision-making process, it often results in less than ideal or even negative outcomes
Safe learning environment
To create a —, team members should model openness and curiosity, explicitly acknowledge when the team lacks answers, ask questions showing that input is appreciated, and reward learning
Dialogue
The intention of — is exploration, discovery, and insight, but the purpose of dialogue is to help team members come to a pressing conclusion, decision, or plan
Meaningful results, satisfy, abilities
For teams to be effective, they must: produce — for the organization, — team members, and enhance the — of team members to work well together in the future
Output, clients
The team’s — (i.e., the product, service, or decision) should meet or exceed the standards of quantity, quality, and timeliness expected by the team’s — (i.e., the people who receive, review, or use the output)
Agenda
Some team members may use their involvement with the team to support a private or personal:
Sustained, minimized
Member motivation must be developed and —, while problems with confusion and coordination are —
Leading a team
— effectively requires that you have a good track record of career success, but it also requires that you gain the respect and commitment of your team members
Impacted
While key constituents are typically individuals inside the organization, such as managers and executives, others outside the organization (customers) could be — by the team’s final product or recommendations
Significant contact
Generally, the most effective teams maintain — with outsiders such as managers, executives, and customers, apprising them of the team’s progress and utilizing their input when making team decisions
Boundary managers
— buffer the team from organizational infighting, persuade top management to support the team’s work, and coordinate and negotiate with other groups on work deadlines
Boundary managers
— play a key role in deciding what needs to be done to ensure that the team understands the positions of others outside the team
Team effectiveness
Running a team whose members are not in the same location poses significant challenges to building:
Team members
— should agree on how they will communicate, how they will engage all members in the decision-making process, and how they will deal with conflict
Teams
— are more effective than groups for complex tasks, when the task requires a diversity of interdependent perspectives and expertise, and/or requires buy-ins from multiple constituencies
Teams
— have shared leadership roles, individual and mutual accountability, specific purpose to the team, complex and interdependent tasks, collective work products, and open-ended discussions
Work groups
— have a clearly focused leader, individual accountability, purpose which is the same as the organization’s mission, straightforward and independent tasks, individual work products, and predetermined work structures