Handouts – Marketing

Types of shoppers
– The Reluctant Shopper
– The Dollar Watcher
– The Pro
– The Candy Store Kids
Power aisle
This aisle tries to convince customers to buy thing they don’t really need, for example paper towels that are on sale.
Marketing techniques
– positioning items in a place they don’t belong
– product positioning can increase the sales enourmously
– layout of a supermarket
– the sense of smell
– the sense of sight
– the sound of music
– advertising
– aisles just wide enough for 2 person to pass by one another
How do advertising find their way into the homes of consumers?
– supermarket logos
– advertising in newspaper and circulars (loss leaders)
bait and hook technique
advertising being the bait to lur consumers into the store and the strategies within the store thatpersuade consumers to spend impulsively, being hooks.
Why is the bar-code scanner known as a behaviour scanner?
The scanner tells the grocery store and e.g. Pepsi that Pepsi was bought, how many bottles were bought, what size and at what time they were bought.
bread
a crumb
butter
a block
clothes
a meter
corn
an ear
glass
a splinter
jam
a jar
grass
a blade
pepper
a dash
hair
a lock
toothpaste
a tube
rain
a drop
paper
a sheet
salt
a pinch, grain
sand
a grain
sugar
a grain
thread
A reel
water
a glass
wood
a splinter
a shop that sells meat
a butcher
a shop where a company sells its goods – use this in business or legal contexts
a retail-outlet
a place that sells cheap plane tickets
bucket-shop
a shop where you can buy fish
a fishmonger
a shop were you can buy glasses and lensesn for it
an optician
small structure on a street, that sells newspapers and magazines
newsstand
a shop that sells bread and cakes, especially one that also makes the bread and cakes
a bakery
a small shop near houses, that sells food, cigarettes, and other things needed everyday
a corner-shop
a very large shop that sells food, drinks, and thing that peple need regularly in their homes
supermarket
a shop with different locks and equipment for it
locksmith
a shop that sells newspapers and magazines, cigarettes, chocolates etc
newsagent’s
a small shop that sells fashionable clothes or other objects
a boutique
a shop, or part of a lerger shop, that sells high quality food such as cheeses and cold meats, often from different countries
delicatessen
a shop that selles tools and equipment for your home and garden
garden-centre
one of a group of large shops that have the same name and are owned by the same company
a chain-store
a shop where you can buy food, alcohol, magazines etc, that is often open 24 hours each day
a convenience-shop
a shop or part of a shop where medecines are made and sold
pharmacy
a shop that sells medecines, beauty and baby product
chemist
a very small shop on a street, that has an open window wehre you can buy newspapers, cigarettes, chocolate etc
a kiosk
Brochures, leaflets and catalogues can describe your product in more detail and give more information than an advertisement.
Sales literature
Displays in retail outlets (supermarkets, chain stores, etc.) can attract the attention of potential customers.
Point of sales ad.
Labels and presentation increase the impact of your product.
Packaging
You can contribute to the cost of a sporting or artistic event, where your brand name or logo is displayed prominently.
Sponsorship
Potential customers can come to your premises and see a display or demonstration of your products and get hands-on experience.
Showrooms
Your company takes a stand or mounts an exhibit to enable customers to see your products and talk to your representatives.
Trade fairs and exhibition
The public are informed of a new development through newspaper articles. You can inform the press by issuing press releases.
Publicity
PR can ensure that your firm keeps a high profile, and that people are aware of your good reputation and image.
Public relations
Existing customers tell their friends or colleagues about your product and hopefully recommend it to them.
Word of mouth
Your staff can call customers, or customers can call a toll-free number to request sales literature or ask for information.
Telephone sales
Your rep can visit customers: this is the most effective method of promotion, but also the most expensive.
Personal selling, e.g. Tupperware
Place in a supermarket where the price of good is added up and you pay for them
Check-out
Extremely important
Crucial
To show
To display
To buy
To purchase
Rich and sweet in taste or smell
Luscious
To refuse to accept
To pass something up
To make or look better
To enhance
To tempt or persuade someone, usually by offering something pleasant
To entice
Writing materials
Stationary
To increase
To up
Printed letter, notice or advertisement sent to a large number of people
Circular
Searching for something by moving things around
To rummage
Passage between rows
Aisle