Classroom Management Final

B.F Skinner
Behavior Modification
Behavior Modification
use positive and negative reinforcements or rewards and punishments to modify or shape students’ behavior
William Glasser
Choice Theory and Quality Schools
Choice Theory and Quality Schools
schools help satisfy students’ psychological needs and add quality to their life. Educators teach, manage, provide caring environments, and conduct class meetings in a way that adds quality to students’ lives.
Thomas Gordon
Teacher Effectiveness Training
Teacher Effectiveness Training
Educators teach self-discipline, demonstrate active listening, send “i-messages” rather than “you-messages”, and teach a six-step conflict resolution program
Lee Canter and Marlene Canter
Assertive Discipline
Assertive Discipline
Educators and students have rights in the classroom. make a detailed list of rules and consequences
Rudolph Dreikurs
Democratic Discipline
Democratic Discipline
Misbehavior results from four major causes (or mistaken goals) educators use democratic teaching, logical consequences, and encouragement rather than praise
Haim Ginot
Congruent Communication
Congruent Communication
educators demonstrate their best behaviors (harmonious with students’ feelings about themselves and their situations) and promote self-discipline as an alternative to punishment
Jacob Kounin
Instructional Management
Instructional Management
Educators use effective instructional behaviors (teaching techniques, movement management, and group focus) to influence student behavior
Curwin and Mendler
Discipline with Dignity
Discipline with Dignity
Teachers are fair and consider individual situations (as opposed to rigid rules) list rules that make sense to students, and model appropriate behaviors – contracts
Frederic Jones
Positive Classroom Management
Positive Classroom Management
affirm students. Educators set limits; build cooperation; and use practical simple, and easy- to- use- strategies
Barbara Coloroso
Inner Discipline
Inner Discipline
Students are worth the time and effort it takes to teach them responsible behavior. Educators avoid punishment and evaluate praise. Instead, they model conflict resolution and use natural consequences.
Jerome Freiberg
Consistency Management and Cooperative Discipline
Consistency Management and Cooperative Discipline
with this school wide model, teachers improve behavior, school climate, and academic achievement. Using caring and cooperation, they also teach self-discipline in the classroom
Forrest Gathercoal
Judicious Discipline
Judicious Discipline
educators provide behavioral guidelines for property loss and damage, threats to health and safety, and serious disruptions of the educational process. They also demonstrate professional ethics and build a democratic classroom
Linda Albert
Cooperative Discipline
Cooperative Discipline
Educators influence rather than control students, helping students connect, contribute, and become capable, educators develop a conduct code that fosters a positive climate in the school
Evertson and Harris
Managing Learner-Centered Classrooms
Managing Learner-Centered Classrooms
educators provide learner-centered classrooms, consider instructional management and behavior management, and begin the school year with clear rules and expectations
Johnson and Johnson
The Three C’s of School and Classroom Discipline
The Three C’s of School and Classroom Discipline
Teachers stress cooperation, conflict resolution, and civic values. They also use these three C’s to address violence, aggression, and physical and psychological abuse, as well as to promote the goals of the safe school movement
Nelson, Lott, and Glenn
Positive Discipline
Positive Discipline
Educators emphasize caring, mutual respect, encouragement, and order; teach the skills needed for successful lives; and conduct class meetings
Alfie Kohn
Beyond Discipline
Beyond Discipline
the new disciplines are no better than the old disciplines. Teachers must look at students positively, and believe that they will make correct decisions.
classroom management
strategies that teachers use to assure physical and psychological safety in the classroom
diversity
differences among students that teachers must consider as they identify appropriate classroom management strategies
inclusion
a policy of educating a learner with special needs in the school whenever possible
safe schools movement
this movement is supported by individuals, professional associations, and governmental agencies and places a priority on making schools safe for students and educators by focusing on the problem of violence and proposing possible remedies
sense of community
a feeling of togetherness, where all students, teachers, and administrators know each other and create a climate for intellectual development and shared educational purpose
target behaviors
educators decide to address these behaviors because they violate class or school policy or interfere with teachers teaching or students learning